Category Archives: Tutorials

Skip to content ROBOCIRCUITWhat is an Arduino? Arduino is a great tool for people of all skill levels. However, you will have a much better time learning along side your Arduino if you understand some basic fundamental electronics beforehand. Introduction Arduino is an open-source platform used for building electronics projects. Arduino consists of both a physical programmable circuit board (often referred to as a microcontroller) and a piece of software, or IDE (Integrated Development Environment) that runs on your computer, used to write and upload computer code to the physical board. The Arduino platform has become quite popular with people just starting out with electronics, and for good reason. Unlike most previous programmable circuit boards, the Arduino does not need a separate piece of hardware (called a programmer) in order to load new code onto the board – you can simply use a USB cable. Additionally, the Arduino IDE uses…

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About Fritzing Fritzing is an open-source hardware initiative to support designers, artists, researchers and hobbyists to work creatively with interactive electronics. We are creating a software tool, a community website and services in the spirit of Processing and Arduino, fostering an ecosystem that allows users to document their prototypes, share them with others, teach electronics in a classroom, and layout and manufacture professional pcbs. An example if Fritzing made Circuit. And Arduino UNO connected with an LCD module.

Arduino – Blinking LED LEDs are small, powerful lights that are used in many different applications. To start, we will work on blinking an LED, the Hello World of microcontrollers. It is as simple as turning a light on and off. Establishing this important baseline will give you a solid foundation as we work towards experiments that are more complex. Components Required You will need the following components − 1 × Breadboard 1 × Arduino Uno R3 1 × LED 1 × 330Ω Resistor 2 × Jumper Procedure Follow the circuit diagram and hook up the components on the breadboard as shown in the image given below. Note − To find out the polarity of an LED, look at it closely. The shorter of the two legs, towards the flat edge of the bulb indicates the negative terminal. Components like resistors need to have their terminals bent into 90° angles…

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